21 Year old Nigerian girl invents ground breaking device to ensure light does go out in medical theaters!


Recently, 21 year-old Nigerian Jaiyeola Oduyoye, a graduate of Product Design Engineering from the University of Derby in the United Kingdom created a ground breaking invention in anticipation of her graduation from the University of Derby in June 2016.

To enhance surgical procedures in hospitals which often suffer from poor electricity, Oduyoye invented a mobile medical battery that provides temporary backup electricity to surgical theaters in developing countries. The invention was “developed for countries that have difficulty accessing uninterrupted power supplies so they are able to perform these surgeries in-country, rather than fly people out”, she said to This Day.

In 2013, Dr. Geoffrey, a Tanzanian surgeon was in the middle of a critical procedure on a child in the country, when power cut. Surgeons such as Geoffrey, throughout Africa often use torches in hospitals due to inconsistent power. As such, this new invention will be serving medical communities across developing countries with much needed support.


“Neva”- the name given to the mobile medical backup, is closely related to an industrial UPS (uninterruptible power supply). It has smooth flat surfaces so it’s easy to be cleaned and unlikely to trap dirt. It contains lithium ion battery packs that have 60 charge cycles and produces a power output enough to provide power for critical machines during surgeries. The battery packs are available for switch and replace. The product however, is completely adaptable to many situations.

It is worthy of note that the battery system of the mobile medical backup enables uninterrupted workflow by eliminating the time intensive and onerous tasks previously associated with battery management, ensuring that nurses and other healthcare professionals can now dedicate additional focus to patient care.



credit – africanleadership.co.uk